White Angelica - Photos Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image White Angelica - Photos Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image White Angelica - Photos Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image White Angelica - Photos Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image 
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White Flowers ( Umbrella-shaped Flower Clusters )
Carrot Family (Apiaceae)

White Angelica, Sharp-toothed Angelica
Angelica arguta

Season: 
Habitat:
 Moist to Wet Meadows and Woods from the Montane to the Alpine
Height:
 50-200 cm

Description: This tall member of the carrot family has a large umbrella-shaped flower head (umbel) composed of smaller clusters of white flowers (sometimes pinkish). The twice (occassionally once) compound leaves are arranged alternately along the erect stems.

Flower: The flowers are arranged in a flat-topped grouping of small umbrella shaped clusters. They are predominantly white in color (sometimes pinkish).

Leaf: The leaves are twice pinnately compound with sharply toothed leaflets (4-14 cm in length).

Fruit/Seed: The dry fruit is smooth with several narrowly winged ribs. Each measures 4-7 cm.

Similar Species: There are several other angelica species. Dawson's angelica (A. dawsonii) has greenish or slightly yellow flowers that rise above a leafy, toothed bract. The leaves are more sharply toothed than Sharp-toothed Angelica. Kneeling angelica (A. genuflexa) is very similar to Sharp-toothed angelica however the sharply toothed leaflets are bent slightly back at the main dividing points rather than standing erect as in Dawson's angelica.

Range: Moist to Wet meadows, streambanks and forests from the montane to the subalpine from southern British Columbia, Alberta and south to Wyoming, Utah and northern California.

The leaves, seeds and stems have been widely used. The leaves smell somewhat like parsley and can be used as a spice or garnish. The Shuswap Indians used the stems like celery and used the plant to help flavor salmon. As a medicine, it was helpful as a digestive aid and to help reduce cramps and nausea. Caution is advised as the roots can be toxic when eaten fresh and these plants should not be used by pregnant women. Most importantly though, you can mis-identify the dangerously toxic water hemlock with fatal results.

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All Material Ward Cameron 2005

 

 

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