Yellow Lady's-slipper - Photos Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Yellow Lady's-slipper - Photos Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Yellow Lady's-slipper - Photos Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Yellow Lady's-slipper - Photos Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image 
Click on an image (if available) to see a larger view

Yellow or Orange Flowers ( Lily-like Leaves )
Orchid Family (Orchidaceae)

Yellow Lady's-slipper
Cypripedium parviflorum

Season: June/July
Habitat:
 Montane Moist Woods
Height:
 Up to 40 cm

Description: Spotting a yellow lady's-slipper (also know C. calceolus) is like finding a treasure. The lady's-slipper has a yellow pouch shaped lip with three purplish-brown, twisted sepals. One sepal points upward from the pouch, the other two at right-angles.

This flower, like most orchids, is very delicate. Please avoid the temptation to pick it. An excellent location for yellow lady's slippers is the Many Springs Trail in Bow Valley Provincial Park (Kananaskis Country).

Flower: The flower has a distinctive yellow pouch surrounded by three widely spread, twisted sepals. The lanceolate sepals often become twisted and are greenish-yellow with purple striping. The bright yellow pouch is 1.5 to 4 cm in length and usually has purple spots lining in the opening. The The flower ranges from 1-5 cm in length.

Leaf: There are usually 3 to 5 clasping leaves that sheat the lower stem. Each leaf is ovate to broadly lanceolate and 5-16 cm long. The leaf surface is somewhat hairy and the veins run parallel to the margin.

Fruit/Seed: Erect, hairy capsule 2-3 cm in length.

Similar Species: The mountain lady's-slipper (C. montanum) has a white pouch and darker sepals. Sparrow's egg orchid (C. passerinum) also has a white pouch and green sepals.

Range: Although uncommon throughout its range, the yellow lady's-slipper can be found throughout most of western North America from southern Alaska, through British Columbia and Alberta and as far east as Newfoundland. It extends south to California, Montana, Wyoming and east all the way to Pennsylvania, Indiana and Illinois.

The Okanagan-Colville Indians used to give an infusion made from the leaves and stalks to women wishing to have a small baby.

Search for recent Yellow Lady's-slipper sightings

Hire an expert guide to help you locate Yellow Lady's-slipper


All Material Ward Cameron 2005

 

 

Birds by Common Name:

 

Birds Listed by Latin Name: