Queen's Cup/One-flowered Clintonia - Photos Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Queen's Cup/One-flowered Clintonia - Photos Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Queen's Cup/One-flowered Clintonia - Photos Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Queen's Cup/One-flowered Clintonia - Photos Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image 
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White Flowers ( Six or More Petals )
Lily Family (Liliaceae)

Queen's Cup/One-flowered Clintonia
Clintonia uniflora

Season: mid-June to mid-July
Habitat:
 Moist Montane Woods from the Montane to the Subalpine
Height:
 Up to 15 cm

Description: Queen's cup offers a surprising discovery along moist, western slope trails. It has several shiny, hairy, like-like leaves. From within the leaves, a single stem arises to terminate in a beautiful, white, six petaled flower. Rarely, there may be a second flower. Before long, the flower gives way to a single deep blue-purple berry.

Flower: The star-like flower has six white, outspread petals (tepals) and six yellow stamens. The flower is 1.5 to 2 cm across and usually occurs singly (sometimes 2 or 3) at the top of a hairy stem.

Leaf: There are 2 to 4 large, clasping basal leaves. The leaves are 8 to 20 cm long, 3-5 cm wide, shiny, and slightly fleshy.

Fruit/Seed: A shiny blue berry at the tip of the stem contains 10 to 15 black seeds. The berry is 6-12 mm long

Similar Species: None

Range: Queen's cup can be found along the Rocky Mountain Ridge ranging from southeast Alaska south to California.

Many Native Canadian groups used the berries were used to form a blue dye or stain. The Cowlitz and Bella Coola Indians used the plants to heal wounds or injuries to the eyes.

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All Material Ward Cameron 2005

 

 

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