Mount Rundle from Vermillion Lakes - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Mount Rundle viewed from Mount Norquay Road - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Mount Rundle - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Mount Rundle - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image
Click on an image (if available) to see a larger version

 

Mount Rundle

Location: Banff National Park, Banff Townsite, AB, Canada, UTM: 11U 605315 E / 5667370 N

Vital Statistics:  Height: 2846 Metres (9,335 Feet) 

Formation Mechanism: Plate Tectonics

Topographic Map: 82o03 Canmore

Description: The smooth sloping face of Mount Rundle has formed the focal point for millions of photographs over the past 100 years. However, as countless visitors snap their shutters at this picturesque peak, few appreciate the summits role as a perfect representative of Front Range mountain structure. Few peaks show the dramatic impact of thrust faulting like Mount Rundle. The Mount Rundle Thrust Fault, found at the base of Rundle’s steep eastern slope, allowed massive layers to be pushed eastward several kilometres. Cascade Mountain and the Three Sisters are part of the same thrust sheet.

The lower slopes are composed of steep, sheer cliffs of Palliser limestone. These hard rocks were formed near ancient coral reefs where lime rich muds were deposited to incredible depths. Similar conditions can be found in the Caribbean today. Moving above these cliffs, the mid-slopes of the mountain take on a softer, more crumbly nature. These soft layers are characteristic of the Banff Shales which form the middle of this three layer sandwich. Dark, and rich in organic matter, the Banff Shales may be 1,200 m thick. Were the hard limestone summit of Mount Rundle to erode away, these shales would quickly follow. Soft and easily eroded, they offer little resistance to the persistent forces of erosion and weathering.

The sheer summit of Mount Rundle is composed largely of ancient marine shell fragments now stranded more than 3,000 m above the nearest ocean. These limestones are part of the Livingstone Formation of the Rundle Group

Photo Tips: 

Hire an expert guide to show you Mount Rundle

View another Landform:


All Material © Ward Cameron 2005