Varied Thrush - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Varied Thrush - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Varied Thrush - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Varied Thrush - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image  
Click on an image (if available) to see a larger version

Mountain Nature Network has become THE place for learning about the birds of the Canadian Rockies.

Varied Thrush
Ixoreus naevius

Kinglets, Bluebirds and Thrushes
Thrush Family (Turdidae)

Size: Length: 25.5 cm

Description: The call of the varied thrush is one of the true signs of spring in the mountains. Males are brightly coloured, and almost resemble a robin. They have a dark gray crown, cheek, neck, back, tail and wings. The throat and breast are orange. There is a dark gray band across the chest and an orange eyebrow line. There is also orange streaking in the folded wings. The belly is mottled white.

Females are more drably coloured, with a more buff coloured breast, eyebrow line and wing streaking. The band across the chest is also very faint, and may not be visible.

Similar Species: The American robin is similar to the varied thrush, but lacks the black band across the chest and the eyebrow line.

Range: The varied thrush is a western bird, very common during summer in the Canadian and northern U.S. Rockies. It becomes even more common on the western side of the continental divide, often wintering on the coast.

Habitat: Look for the varied thrush in damp forests at all elevations from the montane to the subalpine.

Diet: These secretive thrushes like to feed on the ground, sorting through the leaf litter for insects, larvae, ants, worms, as well as berries and seeds.

Nesting: They prefer to built their nest in a small conifer, with a large cup of twigs, grasses, stems, and leaves with an inner cup of mud, grasses, moss and decayed leaves. They generally lay 3 light blue, slightly speckled eggs. Incubation is by the female. The altricial young hatch after approximately 14 days.

Search for recent Varied Thrush sightings

Hire an expert guide to help you locate Varied Thrush

Bird watching in the Canadian Rockies offers endless opportunities for seeing new species. Mountain Nature Network is your source for birding and bird biology.


All Material Ward Cameron 2005

 

 

Birds by Common Name:

 

Birds Listed by Latin Name: