Horned Lark - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Horned Lark - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Horned Lark - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Horned Lark - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image  
Click on an image (if available) to see a larger version

Mountain Nature Network has become THE place for learning about the birds of the Canadian Rockies.

Horned Lark
Eremophila alpestris

Larks and Swallows
Lark Family (Alaudidae)

Size: Length: 18-20 cm Wingspan: 32-36 cm

Description: Look for the horned lark in open spaces--fields, alpine meadows, even tundra habitats above treeline. They are light coloured, with a light brown upper body and white belly. The head has a light brown nape and rear part of the crown. The front of the crown has a pair of black horn like feathers. The forehead, throat and cheek are whitish to yellow. From the base of the beak, a black streak runs beneath the eye, and then outlines the front of the yellow cheek. There is a dark band across the base of the neck. The chest is buff coloured, fading to white on the belly. When on the ground, the tail appears brown, to match the colour of the back, however most of the tail feathers are black. These feathers are revealed when the bird takes to the air. These are birds that prefer the ground. They tend to walk along the ground, flying reluctantly when startled. They walk along, picking up seeds, and the occasional insect. They also nest on terra firma, in a small scraping lined with soft grass, down and hair. During nest building, the female will take pebbles and use them to pave the dirt on one side of the nest. Their call is a twittering notes: "tsee-titi", and is usually reserved for when flying.

Similar Species: 

Range: 

Habitat: 

Diet: 

Nesting: 

Search for recent Horned Lark sightings

Hire an expert guide to help you locate Horned Lark

Bird watching in the Canadian Rockies offers endless opportunities for seeing new species. Mountain Nature Network is your source for birding and bird biology.


All Material Ward Cameron 2005

 

 

Birds by Common Name:

 

Birds Listed by Latin Name: