Eastern Phoebe - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Eastern Phoebe - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Eastern Phoebe - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Eastern Phoebe - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image  
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Eastern Phoebe
Sayornis phoebe

Flycatchers
Flycatcher Family (Tyrannidae)

Size: Length: 16.5-18 cm

Description: The eastern phoebe is quite common in the foothills, but uncommon in the high country of the Rockies. Eastern phoebes have a dark upper body and a light underside. They resemble a sparrow-sized, dull flycatcher. The throat is light, wrapping around the sides of the neck. There is no eye-ring. The beak is dark. The back and scapulars are olive-gray, and the wings and tail, brown. The breast is white with a yellow tinge, but the sides become gray. When feeding, they dart from trees to catch flying insects. Their nest is bulky, made of a variety of plants, often cemented with mud. They may be found under bridges, rafters and within culverts. Incubation is by the female.

Interestingly, an eastern phoebe was the first bird ever to be banded in North America--by John J. Audubon in 1840.

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All Material Ward Cameron 2005

 

 

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