Cooper's Hawk - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Cooper's Hawk - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Cooper's Hawk - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Cooper's Hawk - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image  
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Cooper's Hawk
Accipiter cooperii

Hawks, Eagles and Falcons
Hawk Family (Accipitridae)

Size: Length: Male: 38-43 cm/Female: 43-48 cm Wingspan: Male: 70-80 cm/Female: 80-94 cm

Description: This medium sized Accipiter looks very much like a large sharp-shinned hawk. It has a dark upper body, with a light underside banded with red. The tail is heavily banded, and has rounded edges. Females are somewhat larger.

Similar Species: The sharp-shinned hawk looks similar, but is smaller and the tail has a much more square profile.

Range: Cooper's hawks are found across much of southern Canada, and most of the United States. The can be found in the Canadian Rockies, south of Lesser Slave Lake and throughout the American Rockies.

Habitat: They are found in dense coniferous or deciduous forests.

Diet: Like other Accipiters, the Cooper's hawk feeds on smaller birds, including thrushes, sparrows, finches, and woodpeckers. It will also hunt squirrels and other small mammals.

Nesting: They nest in dense forest areas, often 6-18 m (20-60 ft) above the ground. They build a flat platform into which the female lays 4 (sometimes 5-6) white eggs that may be tinged with blue. There may be some blotching as well. Incubation is by both parents, with the eggs hatching after 23-25 days. The hatchlings are semi-altricial and downy. Both parents care for the young, and the nestlings fledge at 5-6 weeks.

Related Links:

Hinterland Who's Who - Hawks

Search for recent Cooper's Hawk sightings

Hire an expert guide to help you locate Cooper's Hawk

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All Material Ward Cameron 2005

 

 

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