Northern Goshawk - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Northern Goshawk - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Northern Goshawk - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Northern Goshawk - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image  
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Mountain Nature Network has become THE place for learning about the birds of the Canadian Rockies.

Northern Goshawk
Accipiter gentillis

Hawks, Eagles and Falcons
Hawk Family (Accipitridae)

Size: Length: Male: 53-58 cm/Female: 58-64 cm Wingspan: Male: 102-109 cm/Female: 109-119 cm

Description: The goshawk is our largest Accipiter. It has a dark upper surface, with a distinctive black mask. The underside is light, with streaks of gray. The primaries are dark, and the long tail is heavily banded. The females are slightly larger than the males.

They are an exceedingly aggressive bird that will attack anything that approaches their nest.

Similar Species: The other Accipiters are smaller, with more reddish under parts.

Range: While they have a large range, they are very secretive and not often observed. They occur throughout the Canadian and American Rockies.

Habitat: They are a secretive hawk of dense forests.

Diet: They hunt in dense forests for large birds (in particular, grouse) as well as squirrels, hares, rabbits, and just about anything else it can sink its talons into.

Nesting: The large nest is well concealed, usually close to the trunk of a large tree. They will also adopt an old nest build by another bird species, such as an owl or other hawk. The nest is a bulky mass of branches and twigs, lined with strips of bark, leaves and conifer needles. The female lays 2-3 (up to 5) pale bluish-white eggs. Incubation is primarily by the female and the semi-altricial hatchlings emerge in 36-41 days. The male will bring food to the female as she tends the young. They grow quickly and fledge at approximately 45 days.

Related Links:

Hinterland Who's Who - Hawks

Search for recent Northern Goshawk sightings

Hire an expert guide to help you locate Northern Goshawk

Bird watching in the Canadian Rockies offers endless opportunities for seeing new species. Mountain Nature Network is your source for birding and bird biology.


All Material Ward Cameron 2005

 

 

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