American Robin - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image American Robin - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image American Robin - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image American Robin - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image  
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American Robin
Turdus migratorius

Kinglets, Bluebirds and Thrushes
Thrush Family (Turdidae)

Size: Length: 23-28 cm Wingspan: 38-42 cm

Description: Everyone knows the robin. It has a dark upper body, with a white eye ring, yellow black-tipped bill and a chin that is white striped with dark brown or black. The most distinctive feature though is its bright orange breast. The undertail coverts are white.

Similar Species: The varied thrush is similar to the robin, but the varied thrush has a distinctive black band running across its orange breast. It also has a matching orange eyebrow line. It also has some orange visible in its wing feathers and a lighter belly than the robin.

Range: They are found across North America. They are a summer resident in the Canadian and northern U.S. Rockies, occurring year-round through the southern U.S. Rockies.

Habitat: They love grassy fields, lawns and areas adjacent to woodlots. They are rarely found in dense forests, preferring open country. It thrives in the open landscaped produced by agriculture and development.

Diet: They eat insects, often stirring up the leaf litter to see what arises. They are excellent worm hunters and are also fond of larval insects, caterpillars and will also eat berries, sometimes coming to bird feeders for raisins.

Nesting: They build a cup-shaped nest in a variety of locations, some very urban. The nest may be in a tree, shrub, in a natural crook in a building or furniture, on a ledge, and sometimes even on the ground. The nest is a bulky mass of grass, plant stems, string, and anything else that was available. The female lays between 3 and 5 sky blue eggs. She will incubate them on her own, with the altricial young hatching after 11-14 days. Both parents care for the young which fledge at 14-16 days.

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All Material Ward Cameron 2005

 

 

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