Blue-winged Teal - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Blue-winged Teal - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Blue-winged Teal - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Blue-winged Teal - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image  
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Blue-winged Teal
Anas discors

Dabbling Ducks
Waterfowl Family (Anatidae)

Size: Length: 28 cm Wingspan: 60 cm

Description: This medium sized dabbler has a dark head and beak with a distinctive crescent shaped white patch on the cheek. Behind this white patch is a bluish patch which also runs down the right side of the neck to the mid-neck region. Closer to the rear of the head, behind this blue patch, there may also be a small rust coloured patch. The breast and sides are brown speckled with black. When swimming, the upper surface is dark, with patches of blue forewing and green speculum visible.

The hens are drab, however, there is a faint, dark stripe through the eye. A patch of blue and green visible along the side as the folded wings reveal their forewing and speculum.

Similar Species: None

Range: Blue-winged teals are a western bird, generally nesting west of the great lakes. In the mountains, they commonly pass through on migrations, occasionally nesting in both the Canadian and American Rockies.

Habitat: Wetlands, in particular shallow water marshes, lakes and rivers where they can dabble for seeds, small plants and invertebrates.

Diet: They feed on the seeds of sedges and aquatic plants, as well as on small invertebrates found near the surface.

Nesting: Blue-winged teals build their nest on the ground, well concealed and near water. They scrape out a hollow which they line with soft plants and feathers. The hen lays 8-12 dull white to olive coloured eggs, which she will incubate for 23-24 days. The precocial chicks will leave the nest almost immediately, and follow their mother onto the pond.

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All Material Ward Cameron 2005

 

 

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