Eared Grebe - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Eared Grebe - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Eared Grebe - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Eared Grebe - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image  
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Eared Grebe
Podiceps nigricolli

Diving Birds
Grebe Family (Podicipedidae)

Size: Length: 30-36 cm

Description: Horned grebes have a dark head, neck, breast and upper surface. The sides are rusty brown. Most distinctive is the large yellow-orange crest that runs from the bright red eye back towards the rear of the head.

Similar Species: Similar to the horned grebe, the eared grebe has a similarly dark head, but with a much more prominent orange-yellow crest running from the eye and extending beyond the back of the head. Eared grebes also have a black neck as opposed to the reddish neck of the horned grebe.

Range: They are an occasional nester in the northern US and southern Canadian Rockies, becoming more common in the northern Canadian ranges. They migrate through both the American and Canadian Rockies.

Habitat: They are a resident of marshes, shallow ponds and warm, shallow bays. They may also be seen along slow moving rivers. Critical to the equation is a good supply of emergent vegetation, especially rushes or reeds.

Diet: They dive for aquatic invertebrates, in particular water boatmen, beetles and dragonfly nymphs.

Nesting: They build a platform from aquatic plants, and attach it to emergent vegetation. Often the nest will be a floating mass. Both parents incubate the 3 or 4 (may be as high as 6) eggs until they hatch 20-21 days later. The precocial young are able to leave the nest almost immediately.

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All Material Ward Cameron 2005

 

 

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