Red-necked Grebe - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Red-necked Grebe - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Red-necked Grebe - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Red-necked Grebe - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image  
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Red-necked Grebe
Podiceps grisegena

Diving Birds
Grebe Family (Podicipedidae)

Size: Length: 43-56 cm

Description: The laughing call of the red-necked grebe is distinctive, if somewhat uncommon. The head is divided equally between a black upper bill, forehead and crown, with a yellow lower bill, and white chin and cheeks. True to its name, it has a red neck. It has a dark wings, with a light belly becoming rusty towards the sides.

Similar Species: The red-necked grebe is larger than the horned and eared grebes, both of which share some of the rusty markings. Only the red-necked grebe has a red neck with no black. The white throat and cheek are also distinctive.

Range: The red-necked grebe is a northern bird, found as an occasional nester in the Canadian Rockies, becoming somewhat more common as you head south of Glacier National Park in Montana. It is not a common nester through the more southerly American Rockies. It is a common migrant throughout the Canadian and American Rockies.

Habitat: Look for them in freshwater marshes, lakes and slow moving rivers. It is also important that the site have emergent vegetation along the margins for use as nest building materials. They are particularly fond of Rushes.

Diet: They are a diving bird that uses its great swimming ability to catch small fish, insects, invertebrates, and amphibians.

Nesting: They will build a floating nest of emergent vegetation near the margin of their chosen watercourse. It will be padded with crushed down marsh plants. The creamy white eggs turn mottled as the rotting vegetation stains them. Incubation is 23 days and both adults assist in incubation and the raising of the young.

Like most waterfowl, the young are precocious, leaving the nest within a few hours of hatching.

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All Material Ward Cameron 2005

 

 

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