Three-toed Woodpecker - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Three-toed Woodpecker - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Three-toed Woodpecker - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Three-toed Woodpecker - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image  
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Three-toed Woodpecker
Picoides tridactylus

Woodpeckers
Woodpecker Family (Picidae)

Size: Length: 20.5-23 cm Wingspan: 33-38 cm

Description: Another predominantly black and white woodpecker, the three-toed woodpecker has a black head with a white patch running from the eye to the base of the neck, and another running from the base of the beak half-way towards the back of the head. Males also sport a small patch of yellow on the crown. The breast is white, with some light barring along the sides. The back is largely black, with some white bars visible. The wings are also black, with a few white patches visible near the tips. Like the name says, it has only three toes as opposed to the four toes found on most woodpeckers.

Similar Species: Males are easy to distinguish, as they are one of only two Rocky Mountain woodpeckers to sport a yellow crown. The black-backed woodpecker, as its name implies, has a solid black back, where the three-toed woodpecker has alternating black and white patches on the back. They can be distinguished from the red-naped sapsucker and the yellow-bellied sapsucker by the lack of any red on the throat or crown. The hairy woodpecker has a solid white patch running down the centre of the back as opposed to the banded back of the three-toed. Finally, the black-backed has, as its name implies, a solid black back, rather than the barring of the three-toed.

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All Material Ward Cameron 2005

 

 

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