Sharp-shinned Hawk - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Sharp-shinned Hawk - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Sharp-shinned Hawk - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image Sharp-shinned Hawk - Photo Copyright Ward Cameron 2003 - Click to view a larger image  
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Sharp-shinned Hawk
Accipiter striatus

Hawks, Eagles and Falcons
Hawk Family (Accipitridae)

Size: Length: Male: 25-30 cm/Female: 30-36 cm Wingspan: Male: 50-60 cm/Female: 60-70 cm

Description: This small Accipiter has a dark upper surface, and a light, underside streaked with reddish-brown. The head is light, with a dark mask running through the eye towards the nape. Like all Accipiters, it has a long, straight tail, which is heavily banded and square in profile. The males are smaller than the females.

Similar Species: The Cooper's hawk is larger and the tail has a rounder profile.

Range: The sharp-shinned is an uncommon, but widespread hawk. It is found throughout much of Canada and the U.S., and can be spotted throughout the American and Canadian Rockies.

Habitat: They are a bird of heavily wooded forests.

Diet: The sharp-shinned hawk is able to negotiate through the tight trees, looking for small birds, including finches, thrushes, warblers, sparrows and the occasional woodpecker.

Nesting: The well hidden nest will be build in a tree, either near the trunk or in a fork in a branch. The female lays 4-5 (up to 8) bluish-white, variably marked eggs and both parents assist in incubation. Hatching of the altricial nestlings takes place 34-35 days later. The male hunts and passes food to the female who tends the young. They fledge at approximately 23 days.

Related Links:

Hinterland Who's Who - Hawks

Search for recent Sharp-shinned Hawk sightings

Hire an expert guide to help you locate Sharp-shinned Hawk

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All Material Ward Cameron 2005

 

 

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